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Running Out Of Letters – How can business adapt to the next generation?

Thursday 16 March 2017

According to media partner CBR, 2016 was the year the first ‘Generation Z’ graduates made the jump from university to the workplace, while apprentices and non-graduates from the same generation have slowly been trickling into jobs for the past few years.

2016 was the year the first ‘Generation Z’ graduates made the jump from university to the workplace, while apprentices and non-graduates from the same generation have slowly been trickling into jobs for the past few years.

But who are Generation Z? Born between 1995 and 2000, this group represents the first generation to be raised entirely on the internet, with the World Wide Web becoming publically available several years before the first of this generation were born. Subsequent generations are going to be in a similar situation, having never known a world without the Internet or social media.

With this in mind, businesses should begin to take a forward-thinking approach and ensuring that their working environment attracts and retains a new generation of staff. Employers must start considering the wants and needs of younger workers, and begin implementing solutions now that appeal to Generation Z and beyond. But how should businesses do this?

 

Welcome, Generation Z:

Researchers are slowly starting to come to grips with Generation Z, their collective characteristics, their motivations and their environment. Unsurprisingly, given their upbringing, this generation of employees will be particularly tech-savvy and extremely comfortable with social media.

But beyond that, one thing that researchers agree on is that these workers are more interested in a role with purpose rather than the one which offers the best financial incentive. Unlike their millennial predecessors, Generation Z are more inclined to build a career at one company, and therefore likely to repay good employers with loyalty.

In a more practical sense, Generation Z typically prefer multitasking, ideally with an average of five different screens on the go at the same time. This generation are also expected to want to work more flexibly, fitting their lives and jobs together in a less conventional way to the current nine-to-five.

Read more here: CBR

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